Home Blog Alcohol Rehab A CLOSER LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

A CLOSER LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

A CLOSER LOOK AT THE MOST COMMON TYPES OF ALCOHOL ABUSE

As America attempted to plow through the wreckage left by the Prohibition Movement in 1933, the public still faced problems with budding alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Possibly inspired by the early temperance groups that sprouted along the East Coast, individuals started to gather in an attempt to help people suffering from this illness (first identified in print by Dr. Benjamin Rush in the 1700s). While we might not be able to cure the world of alcoholism or additional behavioral problems, addicts can always find a way to help themselves through rehabilitation and hardcore therapy. One of the best examples of self-healing is the group Alcoholics Anonymous, which rose from humble roots to become (possibly) the most famous addiction counseling group in the United States. Let’s take a closer look and find out more about the history of AA.

Making Amends and Building Spirit

Overall, the long history of the alcohol recovery movement took place in unison with the general use of alcohol in our country altogether. Back in the 19th Century, the Oxford Group (a religious organization) was set up to emphasize critical values like self-healing, improvement, and community strength. Two particular elements of this system (self-inventory and making amends) would become two pillars of the 12-Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA).

At one point, Rowland H. (a founding member of Alcoholics Anonymous) asked Swiss psychologist Carl J. Jung for help to treat his alcohol addiction and, soon enough, was introduced to the Oxford Group, who offered an escape through spiritual guidance. By adhering to the principles of this organization, Rowland and fellow alcoholic Ebby T. completely and successfully stopped consuming alcohol. Later, Ebby revealed these concepts of self-healing and improvement to Bill W., one of the founders of AA.

Bill, a successful stockbroker, eventually hit his lowest point at the age of 39 and tried multiple times to dry up, without the help of therapists. In 1934, he experienced a spiritual awakening and was inspired to share his religious-centered views with others suffering from his condition. Later, in 1934, Bill met Robert S., better known as “Dr. Bob,” another founder of Alcoholics Anonymous.

Keeping the Spirit Alive

To date, Alcoholics Anonymous has provided principles of healing that have been applied to additional recovery programs across the United States. Membership is free, but the organization does expect its members to partake in community efforts and help other alcoholics. Overall, AA emphasizes that alcoholism is a physical and a spiritual disease. With the help of a counselor, alcoholics will follow the 12-steps to the recovery process.

Always remember that alcohol does not have control over your life. You do. Are you suffering from a substance use disorder or a severe form of addiction? Do you have a friend or family member suffering from one or more of these debilitating illnesses? If you do, get in touch with Asana Recovery today. Our counselors and healthcare experts are ready to walk you through every step of the detox and withdrawal process and rehabilitation and guide you towards living a happier, healthier, and freer lifestyle. While the road to recovery might not be an easy road to travel, we promise to help you every step of the way. Take the first step to stay fit, healthy, and safe.

The time for you to take back control of your life is now. If you are interested in one of our residential treatment or supervised detoxification/withdrawal programs, we are ready and waiting to speak with you at your disclosure. Call Asana now at (949) 438-4504 to learn how to overcome your alcohol abuse or addiction troubles today.

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