Home Blog Recovery News HOW ICELANDIC FILMMAKERS TACKLED SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN BLOSSI

HOW ICELANDIC FILMMAKERS TACKLED SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN BLOSSI

HOW ICELANDIC FILMMAKERS TACKLED SUBSTANCE ABUSE IN BLOSSI

Over the course of thirty (maybe forty) years, American cinema has produced enough drug films to make us wonder if the industry is secretly crying out for help. From the release of Reefer Madness in 1936, Hollywood has apparently become obsessed with dishing out movies like Easy Rider, Requiem for a Dream, When a Man Loves a Woman, and The Hangover (to name a few). Even Great Britain has jumped on the bandwagon with the infamous but effective film Trainspotting. We might have our sights set on American and British cinema for drug movies, but have you ever looked at the U.S.’s closest neighbor? Believe it or not, around the same time Trainspotting was released, a film company in Iceland developed a wild road trip film that (for lack of a better phrase) is an educational “trip” itself. Let’s take a closer look at how Icelandic filmmakers tackled substance abused in Blossi (1997).

Unoriginal but Still Effective

While the Nordic road movie Blossi (also known as 810551) manages to illustrate the bizarre lengths people will go to achieve mind-altering substances. Directed by Julius Kemp, the film follows the adventures (or misadventures, in this case) of a pair of dropouts who decide to embark on a drug-induced journey across the rugged countryside of Iceland. On one dangerous night, 19-year old Stella (Thora Dungal) accompanied Robbi (Pall Banine) and his violent friend Ulfur (Finnur Johannsson) as they break into an apartment. Next morning, Ulfur orders the couple to complete a mission to achieve drugs, but Stella and Robbi ultimately decide to drive cross-country.

Standard but Graphic

Overall, Blossi (a reference to the drug marijuana) may seem like a foreign reimagining of The Hangover: Part II, but this little Icelandic film can be appreciated for its simplicity and graphic effect. Director Kemp introduces viewers to the characters’ problems from the get-go. Stella appeared to live a happy life until she takes a wrong turn, while Robbi serves as the suffering alcoholic (who has been in rehab). Overall, these two are cutouts but serve as strong vessels for visceral entertainment. Likewise, the landscapes of Iceland provide a surreal, alien backdrop that adds to the surrealistic effect of the movie.

Iceland’s take on drug films might not be well-known, but it might be worth seeing for educational purposes.

Always remember that drugs do not have control over your life. You do. Are you suffering from a substance use disorder or a severe form of addiction? Do you have a friend or family member suffering from one or more of these debilitating illnesses? If you do, get in touch with Asana Recovery today. Our counselors and healthcare experts are ready to walk you through every step of the detox and withdrawal process and rehabilitation and guide you towards living a happier, healthier, and freer lifestyle. While the road to recovery might not be an easy road to travel, we promise to help you every step of the way. Take the first step to stay fit, healthy, and safe.

The time for you to take back control of your life is now. If you are interested in one of our residential treatment or supervised detoxification/withdrawal programs, we are ready and waiting to speak with you at your disclosure. Call Asana now at (949) 438-4504 to learn how to overcome your drug abuse or addiction troubles today.

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